Tuesday, August 6, 2013 5:08pm -0400

Hot Pink Planet Found Around Sun-like Star

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Newly discovered exoplanet GJ 504b Newly discovered exoplanet GJ 504b NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/S. Wiessinger

Astronomers have captured an image of a pink planet around a Sun-like star in the constellation Virgo. About four times the size of Jupiter it is the smallest exo-planet ever found around a star like our Sun. Glowing a dark magenta, the newly discovered exoplanet GJ 504b was found and imaged by Using infrared data from the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii.


GJ 504b orbits its star at nearly nine times the distance Jupiter orbits the sun, which poses a challenge to theoretical ideas of how giant planets form.

"If we could travel to this giant planet, we would see a world still glowing from the heat of its formation with a color reminiscent of a dark cherry blossom, a dull magenta," said Michael McElwain, a member of the discovery team at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "Our near-infrared camera reveals that its color is much more blue than other imaged planets, which may indicate that its atmosphere has fewer clouds."

According to the most widely accepted picture, called the core-accretion model, Jupiter-like planets get their start in the gas-rich debris disk that surrounds a young star. A core produced by collisions among asteroids and comets provides a seed, and when this core reaches sufficient mass, its gravitational pull rapidly attracts gas from the disk to form the planet.

While this model works fine for planets out to where Neptune orbits, about 30 times Earth's average distance from the sun (30 astronomical units, or AU), it's more problematic for worlds located farther from their stars. GJ 504b lies at a projected distance of 43.5 AU from its star; the actual distance depends on how the system tips to our line of sight, which is not precisely known.

gj504 star chart

It orbits the G0-type star GJ 504, which is slightly hotter than the sun and is faintly visible to the unaided eye in the constellation Virgo. The star lies 57 light-years away and the team estimates the systems is about 160 million years, based on methods that link the star's color and rotation period to it age.

Young star systems are the most attractive targets for direct exoplanet imaging because their planets have not existed long enough to lose much of the heat from their formation, which enhances their infrared brightness.

"Our sun is about halfway through its energy-producing life, but GJ504 is only one-thirtieth its age," added McElwain. "Studying these systems is a little like seeing our own planetary system in its youth."

Credit: NASA

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Laurel Nendza

Laurel Nendza is the owner and creator of Stellar Eyes.