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Monday, June 29, 2015 12:00am -0400

The Solstice Sun Dagger of the Ancients

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Summer Solstice Sun Dagger Summer Solstice Sun Dagger Daniel McVey

The Southwest is rich in history and peppered with amazing sites left behind by the indigenous people of the ancient Americas. The heavens were carefully tracked and documented by the natives who once thrived in these sacred lands. Their knowledge was so precise they could predict the very moment of the start of new season. The imprint and legends they left behind were nothing short of remarkable.


I was privileged to witness with my own eyes, up close, and with camera of course, the Summer Solstice Sun Dagger at Hovenweep National Monument. The Sun Dagger is a play of light and shadow that the Ancestral Puebloan or Anasazi people created circa 750 years ago in the Four Corner Region of the American Southwest on the border of Colorado and Utah.

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The Petroglyph panel on which this Calendar is located is at the Holly Site at the canyon floor on a boulder and features 3 concentric circles or solstice markers. The play of 2 points of light crossing the solstice markers and meeting in the middle is created by a fragment of rock which had calved off the larger boulder. I needed to apply for a special use permit just to access the site which can be seen from the canyon wall but from a fair distance. 
 
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Understanding the Solstices and Equinoxes can be helpful in knowing when to plant and also for ceremonial planning. At this particular site it is believed that the Ancestral Puebloan people probably observed this play of light and then etched the solstice markers on the panel. There is no evidence that any rocks were moved.
 
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For more of Daniel McVey's work visit www.danielmcvey.com  or like his Facebook page.
Read 2494 times Last modified on Monday, August 31, 2015 11:02am -0400

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Summer Solstice Sun Dagger at Hovenweep National Monument Daniel McVey